Is The Age Of A Domain Important For Google Ranking?

Age Of A Domain a Ranking Factor

Written by Jeremy Earle, JD

April 20, 2022

Is the age of your domain taken into account by Google’s ranking algorithm? Consider the advice of the professionals. Is Google more likely to provide search results for more established domains? Is it true that purchasing a new domain name puts you at a disadvantage in search engine optimization? Among the many issues concerning domain age as a ranking criterion, which has been actively argued over the last two decades, are the following: Google has developed a document scoring system, so we know they considered it. Read on to determine whether Google uses domain age as a ranking element in search results.

Web page age is a ranking factor

Here’s the gist of the argument:
  • For example, let’s imagine you purchased two domain names, a 2010 domain, and a 2020 domain, in 2010. Because the 2010 domain was registered more than a decade earlier than the second site,
  • Google is more likely to give the 2010 domain a boost search engine rankings.

As a Ranking Factor, Domain Age Makes Sense

Domain age was one of the top ten most essential ranking variables in 2007 by several SEOs. Some have cited this Matt Cutts video as “evidence” that domain age has been a ranking factor in Google in recent months. Why? According to Cutts’ statement in the article, “The difference between a domain that’s six months old vs. one-year-old is not that substantial at all.” According to some, Google does consider domain age as a ranking indication. However, it may not be a very significant one.

Domain Age Is Not a Ranking Factor, according to the evidence.

That video, however, was recorded in 2010. He also stated this, according to Cutts’ own words:
  • The data from the registrar is of no consequence. Google does not have enough access to this data to use it as a trustworthy indicator. Based on this information, Google was able to determine when the site was initially crawled and when another site connected to the site for the first time.
  • Yet he still maintained that “the quality of your material and the links you obtain as a consequence of your quality content are largely what decide how high you’re going to rank in the search engines.”
More information on how Google interpreted these domain signals back in 2005 may be found in a patent application titled “Information retrieval based on historical data” by Matt Cutts, Paul Haahr, and others. Using several forms of data regarding the document’s history, the patent described how to identify the document and award it a score. Why? In it, he stated: “The difference between a domain that is six months old vs. one year old is not that large at all. “ This suggests to some that Google utilizes domain age as a ranking factor – but possibly not a very significant one —

Domain Age Is Not a Ranking Factor, according to the evidence

That video, however, was recorded in 2010. He also stated this, according to Cutts’ own words:
  • The data from the registrar is of no consequence. When a site is initially crawled and connected to another website, Google can determine when that site was first crawled and when that site was first linked by another website. Still, neither of these may be considered credible signals.
  • Yet he still maintained that “the quality of your material and the links you obtain as a consequence of your quality content are largely what decide how high you’re going to rank in the search engines.”
Matt Cutts, Paul Haahr, and others filed a patent application titled “Information retrieval based on historical data” in 2005, which sheds light on how Google interpreted these domain signals at the time. Using several forms of data regarding the document’s history, the patent described how to identify the document and award it a score.
  • The date it was founded.
  • The name of the organization.
  • In the time since the beginning of the period under consideration.
  • Over time, the document’s content changes in a variety of ways.
  • A comparison may be made based on an average time between changes, a total number in a period, and a prior period’s rate.
  • There must be at least one of these metrics: The number of new pages in a period, a ratio between the number of new pages in a period and the total number of pages in the document, or a percentage of the document’s content that has changed over time.
Depending on the link’s behavior, one or more links to the document may exist or vanish at any given time. You can see that this patent was never about domain age alone, but there’s still more to come. Links and content quality/freshness are also included. In the past, domain age may have had a role. However, there is no convincing evidence that it was a direct ranking component, but rather a weak signal inside a complete document history score (and that was/maybe still is the ranking factor. maybe) However, John Mueller has made it obvious that this is what he thinks:

As a Ranking Factor: Domain Age The Final Word

We have no reason to distrust Google when they say that domain age is not a ranking consideration. Google doesn’t care how long you’ve had your domain name. Don’t waste your time and money buying ancient domains. Your SEO efforts may be harmed by junk links or other unfavorable connotations you’ve inherited. However, it’s not only the passage of time that accounts for this; it’s also what transpired in that domain throughout that period. Because Google does not utilize domain age directly in search rankings, this is the most important thing to know:

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